A derelict federation-style house in Melbourne has been transformed into a beautiful piece of artwork — just days before it is set to be demolished to make way for a new housing development. The work is called the Omega Project, and it’s by much-loved Melbourne street artist Rone.

Commissioned by the developer to paint the inside of the condemned house, his signature Jane Doe women stare into the middle distance as you walk through the halls and into the bedrooms. Rone recruited set designer Carly Spooner to decorate the house, turning it an ode to the 70s with its period furniture.

The Omega Project is open free to the public until the house is demolished by August.

Rone’s work has long been organised around the twin pillars of “decay” and “beauty”, and so it is here. Throughout the interior are enormous portraits of a young woman – she’s climbing the walls, looming over each room of the abandoned house like a ghost, her expression ambiguous.

When Rone, born Tyrone West, started making street art, his work was hyper-masculine, as were much of the other images on the street. Then, more than 10 years ago, he changed tact and subject and now nearly all of his work focuses on the female form.

Rone has painted in abandoned houses before, but never legally and never for public exhibition. He was approached by site developer Glenville to paint the house after its owner, art collector Len Warson, expressed interest.

The project was kept a secret by Rone and Warson until it was unveiled this weekend: the most extensive piece of art that Rone has ever created in one space.

The Omega Project by Rone is open until Sunday 30 July at 28 Parkview Road, Alphington in Melbourne.