Another year passes and London’s MERGE Bankside, the month-long free arts festival, has ending after a captivating, creative and all-conquering series ofarts and culture along the capital’s sometimes unloved Bankside.

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Over the course of the month a collection of talented artists made great use of the rich heritage and contemporary culture of the area to create engaging and interactive art installations and follow on from last year’s stellar line up that included a floating Hippo by Dutch artist Florentijn Hoffman and a melting house by Alex Chinneck.

EDITORIAL USE ONLY A visitor looks at 'On Your Wavelength', an art installation created by artist Marcus Lyall, which is powered by brain data donated via an EEG headset by visitors to the MERGE Bankside art festival, in Bankside, London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday October 8, 2015. The installation is controlled in real time by the brain activity of participants. Their mental state is amplified to create a large-scale laser and musical piece, driven by how focused the participant is feeling, and has been made in collaboration with composer Rob Thomas and technologist Alex Anpilogov. Photo credit should read: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

The star attraction was ‘On Your Wavelength’, a mind-powered laser and sound installation, created by Marcus Lyall, the British artist behind award-winning stage visuals for the Chemical Brothers and Metallica, with a soundtrack by Rob Thomas.

EDITORIAL USE ONLY A visitor looks at 'On Your Wavelength', an art installation created by artist Marcus Lyall, which is powered by brain data donated via an EEG headset by visitors to the MERGE Bankside art festival, in Bankside, London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday October 8, 2015. The installation is controlled in real time by the brain activity of participants. Their mental state is amplified to create a large-scale laser and musical piece, driven by how focused the participant is feeling, and has been made in collaboration with composer Rob Thomas and technologist Alex Anpilogov. Photo credit should read: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

Visitors were the catalyst for the piece by wearing a headset that transmitted brain activity into spontaneously choreographed digital artwork, the more you concentrated, the better the show.

EDITORIAL USE ONLY Artist Marcus Lyall with his piece 'On Your Wavelength', an art installation powered by brain data donated via an EEG headset by visitors to the MERGE Bankside art festival, in Bankside, London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday October 8, 2015. The installation is controlled in real time by the brain activity of participants. Their mental state is amplified to create a large-scale laser and musical piece, driven by how focused the participant is feeling, and has been made in collaboration with composer Rob Thomas and technologist Alex Anpilogov. Photo credit should read: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

Bompas and Parr returned for the second year in a row inviting visitors to make a wish in ‘The Chamber of Wishes’ for an interactive installation that took inspiration from the lost springs, wells and grottos of London’s Bankside. The piece used bioluminescent sea water, that made guests putitng a wishing token into the well create a glowing splash of phosphorus shimmer as it entered before an intriguing spectacle as it interacted with the algae’s luminescence.

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At night Adam Frank’s piece the ‘Performer’ saw a brightly lit spotlight take centre space on the pavement of Southwark Street encouraging passersby to perform. Movement triggered a computerised audio “round of applause” which got louder as the movement became more active with rigorous energy providing a deafening sound of a 500-strong audience!

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This year’s festival was curated by Illuminate Productions and supported by Tate Modern and Better Bankside and will be back once more next year… we can’t wait!

All images courtesy of Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire